14 Pews is proud to host
ANTI-RACIST BOOK CLUB - through ZOOM

Our first book will be White Fragility, by Robin Diangelo.
This is through a ZOOM session

We have 15 spots for $20

You will receive ZOOM links August 5th. Please install Zoom onto your computer before August 5th to test.

I look forward to our Anti-Racism Book Club. I will not be acting as a teacher on this subject. Think of me as a guide and facilitator.  I see my role as one who keeps the group focused and on track, with equitable sharing of the airtime.  I want to create a safe place, where people can share insights, stories, and much more. This will not be a recorded Zoom Session, so if you miss it, you miss it. 
 
Because of the work involved to host this book club, 14 Pews has decided to charge. Please do not sign up on Evite.  The first two Book Clubs will be on Zoom so install the latest version onto your computer. In September, we will decide then if it’s safe to have our book club in person.  
 
Below are some of the questions we will explore within the 90-minute time frame:
 
What are some constructive ways to use your emotional reactions when your opinions on racism are challenged?
 
What does it mean to say that race is “socially constructed”? 
 
What is the impact of white people not knowing our racial history? 
 
What does the author mean when she says that white people are not, in fact, racially innocent? How can we know much about race if we have lived separately?
 
What does it mean to say that racism is “a structure, not an event”?
 
The author claims that in the white mind, Black people are the ultimate racial other. What does this mean?
 
What are some of the misunderstandings about affirmative action and what do these misunderstandings reveal about anti-Blackness?
 
How does the author challenge the idea that our intentions are “what count”? 
 
Share a time that you experienced your own white fragility or witnessed another white person’s.
 
What are the opportunities and dilemmas of white people educating each other on racism?
 
The author presents a set of eleven “cardinal rules” (pp. 123-24) when giving feedback to white people regarding racist assumptions and patterns. For each rule of engagement, provide an example of the rule in action.
 
The author argues that emotions are political. How are emotions political? 
 
Discuss the suggestions for continuing the work of anti-racism. Which are the most challenging? How can you meet those challenges?